Indiana farm hosts maple syrup festival

Feb 17th, 2014 | by Eat Drink Indy | Events, News, Travel

By Kelley Jordan Heneveld

Truly a family operation, LM Sugarbush is run by Leane Goering, her two daughters, Jenny and Emily, and their husbands Nic and Robert. They manage 40 acres of trees — that’s about 2,400 trees with about 5,000 tap holes and 14 miles of tubing. After more than 30 years, they are now the largest producers in the area.

Tapped trees will yield sap for maple syrup at  LM Sugarbush near Seymour.

Tapped trees will yield sap for maple syrup at LM Sugarbush near Seymour. Photo by Kelley Jordan Photography

“A lot of people are surprised to find out that there are places that make maple syrup this far south,” said Leane . “You usually think of Vermont or Canada but [maple syrup in Indiana] is an experience that you can have without traveling far.”

When her children were young and she had to be inside with them rather than out in the woods helping her ex-husband, Leane conjured up the idea of a maple syrup festival. Extra income wasn’t her only objective in starting the festival. “Maple syrup lends itself to having people come and watch the process,” she said. “It seemed like something that needed to be shared and adds a lot of pleasure for us to see people enjoy it so much.”

After hearing the family story, I went out with Jenny, Leane’s oldest daughter, to see the property. Because of the unusually cold weather, sap wasn’t flowing very much, and there wasn’t much action. Nevertheless, I saw the acres of tapped maple trees that, in providing food for themselves, create a way of life for this hard-working family.

Logs will be loadedinto the wood-burning evaporator, where the sap will be boiled down into syrup.

Logs will be loaded into the wood-burning evaporator, where the sap will be boiled down into syrup. Photo by Kelley Jordan Photography

In the Indy area, LM Sugarbush Maple Syrup is sold at Good Earth Natural Foods, Pogues Run Grocer and Traders Point Creamery. Or visit the farm — this year’s festival is February 22 and 23, and March 1 and 2.

You can check out more of Kelley’s work at on her Farm Stories site.

Festival info

The 23rd annual Maple Syrup Festival draws thousands of visitors. It runs from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 22-23 and March 1-2 at LM Sugarbush, 321 N. Garrison Hollow Road near Salem; call 812- 967-4491 (toll free at  1-877-841-8851). Admission and parking is free. A pancake breakfast ($7 or $8) is served all day. A chicken, pork chop or pulled pork dinner ($8 to $10) is available from noon to 5 p.m. The festival include guided tours, children’s activities, vendors, traditional music and demonstrations of pioneer crafts. Check out the festival website or Facebook page for more info.

You'll find plenty of syrup at the Maple Syrup Festival at LM Sugarbush. The fest runs two weekends: Feb. 22-23 and March 1-2.  Photoby Kelley Jordan Photography

You’ll find plenty of syrup at the Maple Syrup Festival at LM Sugarbush. The fest runs two weekends: Feb. 22-23 and March 1-2. Photo by Kelley Jordan Photography

 

Visitors to the Maple Syrup Festival can buy it by the jug. It's also available at some Indianapolis-area stores.

Visitors to the Maple Syrup Festival can buy it by the jug. It’s also available at some Indianapolis-area stores. Photo by Kelley Jordan Photography

Jolene’s Blog

Duos to open in Indy City Market

Amid the bad news of restaurant closings in Indianapolis, it’s nice to hear some good news of expansion. Duos, the popular restaurant from Becky and David Hostetter and John Garnier, which also has locations at Eskenazi Health and in the International Medical Group building at Meridian and 30th streets  — as well as a food … more »

MUST-TRY RESTAURANTS

Where to eat now

Stella

611 East St., Indianapolis


Cannon Ball Brewing

1702 Bellefontaine St., Indianapolis

 

Gallery Pastry Shop
1101 E. 54th St., Indianapolis

||WP:global[id=archive-0-archive-el-20]||